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Sexual Violence

Healthcare

  • The impact of a decade of austerity cuts on public services had already been linked to over 130,000 preventable deaths in the UK by 2019. Since 2012, hundreds of vulnerable patients have died following failings by health bodies related to poor, inadequate or delayed care.
  • The Association of Child Psychotherapists identifies a ‘silent catastrophe’ in child and adolescent mental health services. Support on the NHS, especially in terms of specialist or acute services, is becoming increasingly difficult to access. The result has been rising suicide rates and countless people with nowhere else to go into placed they cannot receive appropriate care, such as police custody and hospitals which increases pressure on A&E departments. 75% of mental health issues develop under the age of 24, often as a result of trauma, yet young people’s services receive less than 7% of mental health funding.

Sexual Violence & Mental Health

Almost half of women who experience severe mental distress are survivors of sexual violence. Yet, the support they need to rebuild their lives has become what the women’s movement describes as “a privilege determined by a postcode lottery.” Just 20% of rape crisis services are still fully funded, many have been forced to close down and there are more than 10,000 survivors on the wait list for counselling. 

The more you need support to access justice, the less likely you are to get it. People with mental health issues are 40% less likely to have their case referred for prosecution. Those with learning difficulties see their chances reduced by 67%.

Intersecting Oppression

  • Structural inequality throughout the state and society means that harm is multiplied for survivors impacted by multiple forms of oppression, such as those who are LGBTQ, Black and minoritised, disabled or neurodiverse.
  • Intersecting experiences of oppression also increase your risk of experiencing sexual violence in the first place. 47% of trans people will encounter sexual violence or rape in their lifetime, with Black and Latinx trans women being 53% more likely to suffer at the hands of such life-altering crimes.
  • These structural inequalities continue to shape survivors’ experiences with the criminal justice system. The more you need support to access justice, the less likely you are to get it. People with mental health issues are 40% less likely to have their case referred for prosecution. Those with learning difficulties see their chances reduced by 67%.
  • Racism and other forms of discrimination in healthcare throws up extra barriers to healing and support. Meanwhile, trans and non-binary survivors often excluded from women and male only shelters and services are placed at greater risk of street homelessness and further trauma by the lack of funding for specialist services.

Learn More

To learn more about families like us fighting for truth, justice and accountability after losing someone they love in state care or in detention, visit INQUEST.

To learn more about sexual and domestic violence, support for survivors and campaigns for change, check out these amazing organisations:

On mental health and healthcare inequality, we recommend the work of:

Recommended Reading

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